U.S. Bank announces 2018 Cybersecurity Scholarship recipients

November 13, 2018 | GET MORE : Innovation

Share Article:

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on LinkedIn

There will be millions of unfilled cybersecurity jobs worldwide in the years ahead.

The world needs more protectors.

According to a report by Cybersecurity Ventures, there will be 1.5 million unfilled cybersecurity jobs in 2019. 

With an inherent responsibility to safeguard customer data in its industry, U.S. Bank has launched several initiatives this year to help close that gap by expanding access to cybersecurity education, such as through youth-focused partnerships with nonprofits Technovation, Girls Who Code and Girl Scouts of Western Ohio

Last week, the bank also announced the third annual class of U.S. Bank Cybersecurity Scholarship recipients: 12 students from University of Missouri-St. Louis, Northern Kentucky University, University of Washington and Whatcom College. Over the past three years, it’s given $70,000 in scholarships through the program.

“We are facing a significant talent shortage in the cybersecurity field across all industries,” said U.S. Bank Chief Information Security Officer Jason Witty. “In order to maintain safety and soundness, we need well-trained cybersecurity leaders in our businesses. That is why we are excited to once again provide these scholarships across the country to help further these students’ education and training.” 

The students hail from diverse backgrounds. One recipient, Adelaide Aboagye, originally from Ghana, was pursuing a master’s degree in social work at University of Missouri-St. Louis when a project in her role as a research assistant sparked her interest in cybersecurity and big data.

After exploring the topic by taking an information security class, Aboagye switched her focus and is now well on her way toward a master’s degree in information systems and a certificate in cybersecurity.

Aboagye hopes to bring her new cybersecurity skills and love of research back home in Ghana, where her six older siblings still reside. 

“Growing up in Ghana and now living in the United States I realize how my home country lacks [cybersecurity] tools and resources,” she said. “They bank very differently there – everything is done manually and in-person. I’m afraid personal information is very accessible. There is a definite need for more protection.” 

And with the 1.5 million workforce gap expected to widen to 3.5 million in a few years’ time, that need for protection expands worldwide. 

Fortunately, in the U.S. Bank Cybersecurity Scholarship recipients, the world is set to gain a few more protectors. 

Written by Susan Beatty of U.S. Bank. Learn more about how U.S. Bank approaches cybersecurity.